E-mail:   Password:
Dr. Weil's Optimum Health Plan
Andrew Weil, M.D.

High Cholesterol

What you can do to lower your cholesterol:

  1. Reduce greatly the amount of saturated fat you eat. The richest sources of saturated fat (fat that is usually solid at room temperature) in the diet are dairy foods (except the fat-free versions), especially whole milk, cheese, butter and cream. Red meat is also high in saturated fat
  2. Avoid trans–fat. If you find "partially hydrogenated oil" listed in the ingredient list on food labels, find a healthier substitute. There are many spreads available on the market today that are free from trans-fat. Trans-fat is also found in snack foods like chips, crackers and cookies. It is found in the oils used to cook fast foods such as french fries, doughnuts and movie popcorn.
  3. Substitute soy protein for animal protein. The protein in soy foods has been shown to lower cholesterol levels. Try to incorporate two servings a day into your meals. Choose from tofu, tempeh, soy milk, whole soy beans, and roasted soy nuts.
  4. Use fresh garlic regularly in your meals. Garlic has been shown to lower both cholesterol levels and blood pressure -- and it tastes wonderful, too. Use one or two lightly cooked cloves a day.
  5. Drink green tea daily. The antioxidants in green tea help lower cholesterol and prevent the cholesterol in your blood from oxidizing.
  6. Eat plenty of soluble fiber. Soluble fiber has a powerful cholesterol-lowering effect. The best sources of soluble fiber are beans and lentils, apples, citrus fruits, oats, barley, peas, carrots — especially do not forget ground flax seed.
  7. Lose weight. Even a modest amount of weight loss can lower cholesterol levels.